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2 edition of Negative conditional sentences in Greek and some other Indo-European languages found in the catalog.

Negative conditional sentences in Greek and some other Indo-European languages

Bertha Theodora Koppers

Negative conditional sentences in Greek and some other Indo-European languages

academisch proefschrift terverkrijging van de graad van doctor...aan de Rijksuniversiteit te Utrecht.

by Bertha Theodora Koppers

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Published by Westerbaan in The Hague .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13968773M

historical present and past typical of the other Indo-European languages being lost in Latin and replaced by sustained sequences of historical presents, which are frequent e.g. in :// Abstract. The Proto-Indo-European (PIE) tense-aspect system has been reconstructed since the time of Delbrück () as containing a fundamental opposition between two aspect-denoting stems: An Aorist stem, denoting perfective aspect, and a Present stem, denoting imperfective reconstruction is, for practical reasons, based almost entirely on Greek and ://?language=en.

  Discontinuous past. In some languages a type of tense has been noted with exactly the opposite implication to a perfect. This type of tense is known as discontinuous past. Thus if a sentence such as "I have put the book on the table" implies that it is still on the table, so a discontinuous past sentence "I put the book on the table" in these languages would imply that the book is no longer on (grammar). 1. Introduction 81 o Loss of final stop consonants; final m→n. o Syllabic m̥→am, and ̥→ann, before resonants; otherwise both were nasalized m̥/n̥→ã→a. o loss of s in consonant clusters, with supplementary lengthening, e.g. esmi→ēmi. o creation of secondary s from clusters, ntja→lation ti→si only in southern ://

  I have explained in Revising the classification of Indo-European languages that Latin and Greek are probably hybrid languages with two major components: one Indo-European, and the other from an unknown West Asian language (probably long extinct). There may also be older Neolithic loanwords. It is evidently hard to identify words from an unknown extinct language, so the best way to proceed to Nor has West made use of two other relevant books that appeared even before the book of Mallory and Adams: the first of these is an English-language version of the important survey of Indo-European culture by Michael Meier-Brügger and his colleagues (), and the second is a new synthesis by B. W. Fortson (), which appears in the


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Negative conditional sentences in Greek and some other Indo-European languages by Bertha Theodora Koppers Download PDF EPUB FB2

The University of Chicago Press. Books Division. Chicago Distribution Center Negative conditional sentences in Greek and some other Indo-European languages: B.

Koppers (Diss. Utrecht, Drukk. Westerbaan). The Hague,p Get this from a library. Negative conditional sentences in Greek and some other Indo-European languages. [Bertha Theodora Koppers] Bertha Theodora Koppers, Negative conditional sentences in greek and some other Indo-European languages.

La Haye, Pier Westerbaan, ; 1 vol. in-8° br., p. Il s'agit là d'une «Academisch proeschrift», c'est-à-dire d'un mé- 1. Bertha Theodora Koppers, Negative Conditional Sentences in Greek and some other Indo-European languages.

Academisch Proefschrift. Utrecht,1 vol. 16x24 cm, :// Bertha Theodora Koppers, Negative conditional sentences in greek and some other Indo-European languages, By Paul Burguière Publisher: PERSÉE - ENS de Lyon, Université de Lyon & CNRS Older Indo-European languages may use the fronted interrogative negation as a negative conditional, cf.

e.g. Old Latin nī ‘if not’. 29 Attenuation of negation: negative conditional negations meaning ‘if not’ take on the non-negated meaning ‘or’ through the logical equivalence of {X, if not Y} = {X or Y}.

://?language=en. N.—Since Greek is connected with the other Indo-European languages, the roots which we establish in Greek by analysis of a word into its simplest form often reappear in the connected languages (p. 1, A). Thus, the root φερ of φέρω I bear is seen in Sanskrit bhárāmi, Lat.

fero, Germ. ge-bären. The assumption of roots is merely a ?doc=Perseus:textpart=2:chapter= The general portrayal of Greek as a single-language branch within Indo-European is grossly misleading. Greek is not actually a single language. There are at the very least two Greek languages spoken today: Modern Standard Greek, and Tsakonian.

Tsa OCLC Number: Description: pages 23 cm: Contents: I. Functional analysis of the types of negative: Nexal and special negatives ; Negative with contrary meaning ; Quantitative and qualitative negatives nexal negatives in Indo-European and Greek: The forms in Indo-European and Greek ; ou: it's origin ; The accentuation of ou and me ; the :// In the beginnings of the Indo-European or Indo-Germanic studies using the comparative grammar, the Indo-European proto-language was reconstructed as a unitary language.

For Rask, Bopp and other Indo-European scholars, it was a search for the Indo-European. Such a language was   1. The Indo­European Family of Languages.

— Latin belongs to one group of a large family of languages, known as Indo­European. [1] This Indo ­European family of languages embraces the following groups: ASIATIC MEMB ERS OF THE INDO­EUROPEAN For the same reason that the structure that provides the lift enabling a flea and an Airbus to fly is called a wing.

It would take too much time to answer your question adequately, so I will restrict myself to a few illustrative examples from Conditional sentences, type I, if clauses, Negations.

Task No. Put the verbs in brackets into the gaps. Form a Conditional sentence – type use the will-future in the main clauses. Mind the negations in the sentences. Show example   Genitive is what we'd now call "possessive," and dative is the indirect-object case, also used after some prepositions. Proto-Germanic shares these inflectional systems with Latin and Greek and other I-E languages, leading us to believe that I-E had a very similar inflectional ://   The dative case (abbreviated dat, or sometimes d when it is a core argument) is a grammatical case used in some languages to indicate the recipient or beneficiary of an action, as in "Maria Jacobo potum dedit", Latin for "Maria gave Jacob a drink".

In this example, the dative marks what would be considered the indirect object of a verb in English. Sometimes the dative has functions   In so doing, the researchers found evidence that some fairy tales, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, were rooted in other stories, and could be traced back to a time when Western and Eastern Indo-European languages split, which was approximately 5, years ago, which means of course that they predate the Bible, for example, or even Greek myths.”   In grammar, tense is a category that expresses time reference with reference to the moment of speaking.

Tenses are usually manifested by the use of specific forms of verbs, particularly in their conjugation patterns. The main tenses found in many languages include the past, present, and languages have only two distinct tenses, such as past and nonpast, or future and :// This monograph presents a general picture of the evolution of IE verbal systems within a coherent cognitive framework.

The work encompasses all the language families of the IE phylum, from prehistory to present day ed by the ideas of Roman Jakobson and Gustave Guillaume the authors relate tense and aspect to underlying cognitive processes, and show that verbal systems have a   Since conditional sentences are basic to the material of the Greek New Testament, a detailed understanding of conditional sentences is vital for an accurate interpretation of its contents.

This, then, is the goal of this study: to explore conditional sentences so that the message of the New Testament may be better. "Knowing" Words in Indo-European Languages.

The first systematic theory of the relationships between human languages began when Sir William Jones, "Oriental Jones," proposed in that Greek and Latin, the classical languages of Europe, and Sanskrit [Sãskṛta, ], the classical language of India, had all descended from a common similarities between the languages NOTE.

The static passive is a new independent formation of many Indo-European dialects, not common to Late PIE, but a common resource of North -West Indo-European, easily loan translated from Romance, Germanic and BaltoSlavic languages into Modern Indo- -European as auxiliary verb.

The Greek language: spoken in Greece and Greek Cyprus. The Albanian language: which branched off of the Indo-European languages. The Armenian language: [not spoken in Europe!] considered one of the languages of the European continent despite a dispute over considering Armenia as belonging to Europe ://